Power and decision making: new directions for research in the age of artificial intelligence

Fast, N., & Schroeder, J. (2019). Power and decision making: new directions for research in the age of artificial intelligence. Current Opinion in Psychology 172-176.

  • Short Summary: Throughout history, the experience of power has occurred within the context of human–human interactions. Such power can influence decision making through at least two primary mechanisms: (1) increased goal-orientation, and (2) increased activation of social role expectations. Importantly, new advances in artificial intelligence (AI) are creating the potential to experience power in human–AI interactions. To the extent that some forms of AI can be made to seem like low-power humans (e.g. autonomous digital assistants), people may feel powerful when interacting with such entities. However, it is unclear whether feeling power over AI will lead to the same psychological consequences as feeling power over humans. In this article, we review findings on power and decision making and then consider how they may be meaningfully extended by considering interactions with artificially intelligent digital assistants. We conclude with a call for new theorizing and research on power in the age of artificial intelligence.

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Two social lives: How differences between online and offline interaction influence social outcomes

Lieberman, A., & Schroeder, J. (2019). Two social lives: How differences between online and offline interaction influence social outcomes. Current Opinion in Psychology, 31, 16-21.

  • Short Summary: For hundreds of thousands of years, humans only communicated in-person, but in just the past fifty years they have started also communicating online. Today, people communicate more online than offline. What does this shift mean for human social life? We identify four structural differences between online (vs. offline) interaction: 1) fewer nonverbal cues, 2) greater anonymity, 3) more opportunity to form new social ties and bolster weak ties, and 4) wider dissemination of information. Each of these differences underlie systematic psychological and behavioral consequences. Online and offline lives often intersect; we further review how online engagement can (1) disrupt or (2) enhance offline interaction. This work provides a framework for studying the influence of technology on social life.

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Tell it Like it is: When Politically Incorrect Language Promotes Authenticity

Rosenblum, M., Schroeder, J., & Gino, F. (in press). Tell is like it is: When politically incorrect language promotes authenticity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

  • Short Summary: This paper tests how political language influences impressions of a communicator. Using more politically incorrect (vs. correct) language made a communicator appear more authentic but less warm, and these impressions were moderated by both the political ideology of the perceiver and of the target group to whom the language was applied. (9 experiments).

  • Data, Materials, and Preregistrations

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