Functional Intimacy: Needing—But Not Wanting—the Touch of a Stranger

Schroeder, J., Fishbach, A., Schein, C., & Gray, K. (2017). Functional intimacy: Needing—but not wanting—the touch of a stranger. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 113, 910-924.

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Many Hands Make Overlooked Work: Overclaiming of Responsibility Increases With Group Size

Schroeder, J., Caruso, E., & Epley, N. (2016). Many hands make overlooked work: Overclaiming of responsibility increases with group size. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 22, 238-246.

  • Short Summary: Overclaiming (when group members’ contribution claims sum to more than 100 percent) increases as the group size increases because people fail to sufficiently consider their group members’ contributions (4 studies).

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How to Motivate Yourself and Others? Intended and Unintended Consequences

Schroeder, J., & Fishbach, A. (2015). How to motivate yourself and others? Intended and unintended consequences. Research in Organizational Behavior, 35, 123-141.

  • Short Summary: We overview three common motivational strategies and when they backfire: giving feedback, setting goal targets, and applying incentives.

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The “Empty Vessel” Physician: Instrumentality Makes Physicians Seem Personally Empty

Schroeder, J., & Fishbach, A. (2015). The “empty vessel” physician: Instrumentality makes physicians seem personally empty. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 6, 940-949.

  • Short Summary: Individuals who have more need for medical care focus more on physicians’ traits relevant to their needs, perceiving physicians as more competent and failing to notice their personal emotions (6 experiments).

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Mistakenly Seeking Solitude

Epley, N., & Schroeder, J. (2014). Mistakenly seeking solitude. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143, 1980-1999.

  • Short Summary: People prefer to sit in solitude in public settings (on buses, trains, cabs, and in waiting rooms) than to talk to a stranger, but when randomly assigned to talk to a stranger in these same settings, report greater happiness and no less productivity compared with sitting in silence or doing what they want (10 experiments).

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